Ripped off by Comcast?
Here are your options.

Customer service at big companies is often designed to frustrate you so that you'll go away. Here are some better options for fighting back:

Produced by Radvocate's Comcast Customer Action Center

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Hack customer service. If you've ever called or chatted customer service, you've probably walked away disappointed. Endless wait times, unhelpful agents and dropped connections can make the experience incredibly frustrating. But there are ways to avoid the wait and connect directly with someone at Comcast who can help you. 

This option requires the least effort, but it is also the least likely to get your problem fixed. It can also result in uncomfortable experiences - some customers report aggressive encounters with agents and executives when they go around the usual customer service process.

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Go to Small Claims Court. Your Comcast contract forbids you from suing Comcast in a real court, but you can still argue your case in Small Claims Court. In most states, you can sue in small claims for an amount under $5000 or $10,000, which is enough to cover most claims against Comcast. Usually Comcast will contact you to fix your problem before you have to show up in court.

Small claims is a great option if you're willing to spend some time and effort. It usually results in a positive outcome for the complaint. However, the process can be very complicated, and may require multiple trips to the county courthouse during business hours.

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Arbitrate. If you want to sue Comcast for more than the small claims limit, or if you don't want to take time off of work to show up for a court hearing, you can file a consumer arbitration against Comcast. A consumer arbitration is an informal, but binding, process that allows you to make your case in front of a neutral third party (usually a lawyer). It's like going to court, but faster, simpler and less expensive.

Arbitration is usually just as effective as small claims court, but doesn't require trips to the courthouse. While it can also be a complicated process if you go it alone, Radvocate makes it easy and free to file many consumer arbitrations against Comcast.